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KSL CrimeWatch

KSL CRIMEWATCH is a fast-paced show that puts you inside the top priorities of local law enforcement. Hosted by former chief of police in Salt Lake, Chris Burbank, the goal of KSL Crimewatch is simple: help keep Utahns safe. Episodes feature tips on how to protect you, and your family and give communities along the Wasatch Front opportunities to help authorities solve a crime. Designed from its inception to appeal to modern audiences, each episode is only a few minutes long and is heavily produced with visuals and animations. New episodes are available multiple times a month. KSL Crimewatch is produced by KSL NEWSRADIO with support from the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office.
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Dec 4, 2017
Periodically, we may all get an email from our banking institution informing us of something new at the bank or credit union. But what if a predator uses the bank's logos and makes an email look EXACTLY as if it came from the bank? Former chief of police Chris Burbank gives us a few quick tips on how to detect fraud, and how to avoid falling victim to it. *** Criminals are very creative. In fact, you may receive an email that has all the banking institution’s company logos on there, and it’s asking you, “We have a problem, there’s nothing to worry about. Send us your account number and PIN, and we’ll change this for you.” If you receive anything like that, call the banking institution and find out. Companies are very careful, because they don’t want to be exposed. Nor do they want you, as a customer, to be exposed to criminal behavior—to someone trying to steal from them or from you as a customer. If somebody calls you claiming to be a banking institution, or somebody wants to give you money—if anyone ever asks for your personal information over the phone, or for bank information, simply say: “What number can I call you back on, or who do you represent and I’ll call the company myself and engage in that.” Even if you want to donate money, I would never donate money to anyone who cold-calls, who just calls people randomly out of the blue. I would simply say, “Thank you very much. I will contact the institution and I will make my donation that way.” That is always the best way to do business.
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