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KSL CrimeWatch

KSL CRIMEWATCH is a fast-paced show that puts you inside the top priorities of local law enforcement. Hosted by former chief of police in Salt Lake, Chris Burbank, the goal of KSL Crimewatch is simple: help keep Utahns safe. Episodes feature tips on how to protect you, and your family and give communities along the Wasatch Front opportunities to help authorities solve a crime. Designed from its inception to appeal to modern audiences, each episode is only a few minutes long and is heavily produced with visuals and animations. New episodes are available multiple times a month. KSL Crimewatch is produced by KSL NEWSRADIO with support from the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office.
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Now displaying: November, 2017
Nov 29, 2017
With Cyber Monday's orders getting ready to ship, how do you protect those package deliveries from thieves? Former SLCPD Chief Chris Burbank gives us a few options to minimize risk and bond together as neighbors. *** Mail order has become a huge business. We get lots of deliveries. People are sending us things, and we are ordering things. One theft that happens often during the holiday season is package theft. The nice thing about the computerized system and everything that exists in most mail order businesses—they can tell you exactly when that package is going to be delivered. If you are not going to be home, make arrangements for that package to be delivered to a neighbor’s house. Have a neighbor come pick it up—someone that you trust. Have it delivered to the back door in some circumstances. One of the things that we most often miss out on is getting to know your neighbors. When you can trust your neighbors, when your neighbors watch your house, you watch their house—on both sides of your home. You know the neighbors really well, those three homes watch out for each other. Boy, we would be very safe. It’s about reducing our exposure to risk. Minimize the chances that that package will be stolen. You can reduce the chance that you will lose that package before Christmas.
Nov 20, 2017
How do you help keep your home safe during the holidays? What does your home look like during the holidays? What does it look when you are there? What does it look like when you are gone. Former SLC Police Chief and current Director of Law Enforcement Engagement with the Center for Policing Equality Chris Burbank gives tips and tricks on how to prevent crime at your house this holiday season. Whether you're using timers or apps to control your lights or other home devices, there are several smart choices you can make that minimize the risk of burglary--even where you choose to place those Christmas presents. *** An important thing when participating in the holidays is just home safety. What does your home look like when you’re there, and what does it look like when you’re gone? If the two are similar, then it’s very difficult for someone to look and say “Ah, no one’s home I’m going to go in there.” Leave lights on. Leave radios on. Change and vary when you come and go, or maybe when the lights come on and go off. Very inexpensive timers from any home store can be installed. Remember, criminals are always looking for opportunity. If you can make them think someone might be home, they are not going to enter your home. If you are going out, close your garage door. If you have large, expensive presents, don’t leave those in locations that they can be seen from the street. Put those in a different location until the time comes to open those gifts.
Nov 16, 2017
With a few decades in law enforcement along the Wasatch Front, former SLCPD Chief Chris Burbank holds a unique perspective when it comes to crime--he sees and explains both sides extremely well. When you see lights flashing in your rear view mirror, Chris explains a few things you can do that may make both parties feel more comfortable. *** Nobody, I mean nobody, including myself, likes to be driving down the street and see red and blue lights come on behind you. What do you do? First and foremost, pull to the right hand side of the road, no matter the circumstance. Maybe you’re not the one they’re looking for. They have to pass on the left-hand side when they engage their lights and sirens. If you are, in fact, the unfortunate one being stopped, pull to the right and come to a stop. That doesn’t mean a hard turn or anything else—move yourself over and come to a complete stop. What do I do when I’m stopped? I leave my hands in plain view, on the steering wheel. I actually, if it’s night time, turn on the interior lights of the car. A police officer who can see what’s in the vehicle, know the people who are in there, is much less concerned about their personal safety. Does this mean that you’re overly acquiescing, or giving in to maybe a stop you disagree with? Absolutely not. What you are providing is a safe, comfortable environment to talk to that police officer about why your were stopped. And maybe even, maybe even, get out of the ticket.
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