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KSL CrimeWatch

KSL CRIMEWATCH is a fast-paced show that puts you inside the top priorities of local law enforcement. Hosted by former chief of police in Salt Lake, Chris Burbank, the goal of KSL Crimewatch is simple: help keep Utahns safe. Episodes feature tips on how to protect you, and your family and give communities along the Wasatch Front opportunities to help authorities solve a crime. Designed from its inception to appeal to modern audiences, each episode is only a few minutes long and is heavily produced with visuals and animations. New episodes are available multiple times a month. KSL Crimewatch is produced by KSL NEWSRADIO with support from the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office.
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Now displaying: October, 2017
Oct 10, 2017
Children and teens unknowingly share a lot of information with others on the web. Information that, in the wrong hands, can compromise their own safety. Former Salt Lake County Sheriff Jim Winder gives parents a few tips on keeping things secure from the home front. *** Technology—one of the greatest opportunities of our culture. And also one of the greatest risks. Today, every youngster it seems has a mobile device—a telephone, or iPad, or a computer at home. These devices can bring the world to their doorstep. It can also bring predators. It’s imperative that you understand and observe what your child is doing online. Even the most simple of behaviors can result in contact with an individual that may pose a risk to your child. When kids are online, they will often share information that, to them, seems very ubiquitous. The reality is, sharing your age, name, phone number, and especially their location can bring with it significant risks. It’s imperative that you train your children that when they’re online, they have to have a sense of anonymity. If they do need to provide specific information, to any site or individual online, they should verify that first with a parent before they ever enter it into a computer. That data can be used for good, and it certainly can be used for ill. Remember, it’s not an invasion of privacy—it’s taking care of your children. It’s our job to keep our children safe.
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